Thursday, September 15, 2011

CLASSIC VIDEO... IT NEVER GETS OLD

video

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

That poor Tuber, I hope he makes it to the Banner Cerem ony at Steed ark Saturday night. All the gang will b e there.

Missing Thumb said...

O, Lord, he'll never make up the hill, Dingo. WEe hope he does but....

Adult Protective Services said...

Elder abuse.

Tom Thumb said...

LORD, THAT POOR OLD SOUL IS TRYING TO COUGH UP A HAIR BALL.

Thumbilina said...

This is uncanny. They install a girl as prestdent of the 'Nofre surfing club and they have that lout in a gawd awful sneeze. Can you believe it.

Harvey Wallbanger said...

Is that Sydney Carton Esq. by any chance. If it I'm voting for him as Blog moniter. That guy with the wheezy cough is iritating to the max. He must be from San Onofre Central.

The Huge Goiter said...

Hey now. I have a pregnant idea. Why not get a midgeto on the SCSC BOD. Not a bad idea, huh?

Jed Morose said...

Jeezus, someone call 911. That poor fellow's having some sort oa siezure.

Anonymous said...

Steak is a big pain in the ASS!!!!! Go to the beach and stay there!!!!

Anonymous said...

Why is that mans face all pixel-ed out?

Joe Stugbats said...

Anon' #2, a pain in whose ass, certainly not mine. Tub e shall visit that gawd forsaeh San Onofre to right the ship.before it's too late. Aloha & mahalo.

John Cairns said...

I'll bet the old geezer can't get to his feet no more. If he showss up gown ered I'll go behin dc him--fast.

Sydney Carton, Esquire said...

The topper is the woman's voice at the end, calling out from the other room with . . . (I won't spoil it if you missed it, listen again).

Anonymous said...

The terms metaphor and simile are slung around as if they meant exactly the same thing.

A simile is a metaphor, but not all metaphors are similes.

Metaphor is the broader term. In a literary sense metaphor is a rhetorical device that transfers the sense or aspects of one word to another. For example:


The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas. — “The Highwayman,” Alfred Noyes

Here the moon is being compared to a sailing ship. The clouds are being compared to ocean waves. This is an apt comparison because sometimes banks of clouds shuttling past the moon cause the moon to appear to be moving and roiling clouds resemble churning water.

A simile is a type of metaphor in which the comparison is made with the use of the word like or its equivalent:


My love is like a red, red rose. — Robert Burns

This simile conveys some of the attributes of a rose to a woman: ruddy complexion, velvety skin, and fragrant scent.


She sat like Patience on a Monument, smiling at Grief. — Twelfth Night William Shakespeare

Here a woman is being compared to the allegorical statue on a tomb. The comparison evokes unhappiness, immobility, and gracefulness of posture and dress.

Some metaphors are apt. Some are not. The conscientious writer strives to come up with fresh metaphors.

A common fault of writing is to mix metaphors.

Before Uncle Jesse (Dukes of Hazzard) did it, some WWII general is reputed to have mixed the metaphor Don’t burn your bridges, meaning “Don’t alienate people who have been useful to you,” with Don’t cross that bridge before you come to it, meaning “Don’t worry about what might happen until it happens” to create the mixed metaphor: Don’t burn your bridges before you come to them.

Many metaphors are used so often that they have become cliché. We use them in speech, but the careful writer avoids them: hungry as a horse, as big as a house, hard as nails, as good as gold.

Some metaphors have been used so frequently as to lose their metaphorical qualities altogether. These are “dead metaphors.”

In our own time we have seen the word war slip into the state of a dead metaphor: the war on drugs, the war on poverty, the war on AIDS. In these uses the word means little more than “efforts to get rid of” and not, as the OED has it:


Hostile contention by means of armed forces, carried on between nations, states, or rulers, or between parties in the same nation or state; the employment of armed forces against a foreign power, or against an opposing party in the state.

In a sense, all language is metaphor because words are simply labels for things that exist in the world. We call something “a table” because we have to call it something, but the word is not the thing it names.

Wally George said...

Mr.Sydney Carton Esq., I did replay the feller' sneeze, you are correct, the poor woman appeared terrified as she heard th old fool sneeze, me too was frieghtened as the commotion took place. Dingo should be careful when posting.She may have thought something was amiss.

Moon Phase