Friday, May 02, 2008

Sano daze commenters unfair to surf legends


B.K. is getting his camera ready for the OXBOW world championships at old mans. Colin mcphillips will win and bring home the glory. get your aloha on and welcome the worlds finest surfers and their sponsers to old mans!

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

BK is grossly underated. Had he not suffered as severe sorain on both wruts, he'd blow McPhillips out of the water. Is Colin in the Senior Grandmasters, or what? I hope Allan C.Moore makes a fortune off this thing.



#212

Today's lesson said...

What Is A Sentence?

What does it take to make a sentence? A sentence has (at least) three things:

1. a subject: what we are talking about, usually a noun or pronoun

2. a verb: tells that the subject does something or is something, and

3. a characteristic: can stand alone, can be independent.

This is a sentence: He called.

He is the subject. Called is the verb.

The following are not sentences, even though each has a subject and verb:

Because he called

When he called

He calling

The items above lack the characteristic can stand alone.

Of course, most sentences we speak or write have more than just a subject and verb, but to be complete, a sentence must have at least a subject and a verb and be able to stand alone.

Sentences that are not complete are called sentence fragments, or fragment sentences, or just fragments. Teachers often write “frag” of “SF” for this error.

Remember that you should write in complete sentences. Let us know if we can offer you more information or practice in writing complete sentences.

lesson #2 said...

Comma Usage
Use a comma before a co-ordinating conjunction that joins independent clauses (unless the independent clauses are very short):
I wrapped the fresh fish in three layers of newspaper, but my van still smelled like trout for the next week. (commas with two independent clauses)
She invited him to her party and he accepted. (comma unnecessary with short clauses)
Use a comma after an introductory adverb clause and, often, after an introductory phrase (unless the phrase is very short):
After the hospital had completed its fund-raising campaign, an anonymous donor contributed an additional $10,000. (after introductory adverb clause)
From the east wall to the west, her cottage measures twenty feet. (after introductory prepositional phrase)
In the bottom drawer you will find some pink spandex tights. (no comma with short, closely related phrase)
Use a comma to separate items in a series:
Playing in a band can be exciting, but many people do not realize the hardships involved: constant rehearsals, playing until 2 a.m., handling drunken audience members, and transporting heavy equipment to and from gigs. (the comma preceding "and" is optional unless needed to prevent misreading)
Use commas to set off non-restrictive elements and other parenthetical elements. A non-restrictive modifier is a phrase or clause that does not restrict or limit the meaning of the word it is modifying. It is, in a sense, interrupting material that adds extra information to a sentence. Even though removing the non-restrictive element would result in some loss of meaning, the sentence would still make sense without it. You should usually set off non-restrictive elements with commas:
The people of Haiti, who for decades have lived with grinding poverty and mind-numbing violence, are unfamiliar with the workings of a true democracy.
A restrictive modifier is a phrase or clause that limits the meaning of what it modifies and is essential to the basic idea expressed in the sentence. You should not set off restrictive elements with commas:
Those residents of Ottawa who do not hold secure, well-paying jobs must resent the common portrayal of the city as a land of opportunity.
Note that you can use two other punctuation marks to set off non-restrictive elements or other parenthetical information: parentheses and dashes. Enclosing parenthetical information in parentheses reduces the importance of that information:
Mr. Grundy's driving record (with one small exception) was exemplary.
Placing parenthetical information between dashes has the opposite effect: it emphasises the material:
Mr. Grundy's driving record -- with one exception -- was exemplary.
Nevertheless, you should usually set off parenthetical information with commas.
Superfluous Commas
Equally important in understanding how to use commas effectively is knowing when not to use them. While this decision is sometimes a matter of personal taste, there are certain instances when you should definitely avoid a comma.

Do not use a comma to separate the subject from its predicate:
[WRONG] Registering for our fitness programs before September 15, will save you thirty percent of the membership cost.
[RIGHT] Registering for our fitness programs before September 15 will save you thirty percent of the membership cost.
Do not use a comma to separate a verb from its object or its subject complement, or a preposition from its object:
[WRONG] I hope to mail to you before Christmas, a current snapshot of my dog Benji.
She travelled around the world with, a small backpack, a bedroll, a pup tent and a camera.
[RIGHT] I hope to mail to you before Christmas a current snapshot of my dog Benji.
[RIGHT] She travelled around the world with a small backpack, a bedroll, a pup tent and a camera.
Do not misuse a comma after a co-ordinating conjunction:
[WRONG] Sleet fell heavily on the tin roof but, the family was used to the noise and paid it no attention.
[RIGHT] Sleet fell heavily on the tin roof, but the family was used to the noise and paid it no attention.
Do not use commas to set off words and short phrases (especially introductory ones) that are not parenthetical or that are very slightly so:
[WRONG] After dinner, we will play badminton.
[RIGHT] After dinner we will play badminton.
Do not use commas to set off restrictive elements:
[WRONG] The fingers, on his left hand, are bigger than those on his right.
[RIGHT] The fingers on his left hand are bigger than those on his right.
Do not use a comma before the first item or after the last item of a series:
[WRONG] The treasure chest contained, three wigs, some costume jewellery and five thousand dollars in Monopoly money.
[WRONG] You should practice your punches, kicks and foot sweeps, if you want to improve in the martial arts.
[RIGHT] The treasure chest contained three wigs, some costume jewellery and five thousand dollars in Monopoly money.
[RIGHT] You should practice your punches, kicks and foot sweeps if you want to improve in the martial arts.

sally pineapple said...

Alright, 'Today's Lesson' I thought this was about BK's sentrnce, boy was I wrong. Instead of dazling us with transitive and intransitive verbs, maybe you should concentrate on your graphics, and you know what they are. If not, you just saw one following graphics, preceeding and.
Unfortunatly, San O daze has no editor to help you.

Shotzy Shaffer said...

I stand corrected, my english aint as good as it could be, but i get the point across.

sally pineapple said...

Shotzy, for chrissake, you gots to concentrate on your, I repeat, graphics. It burns me up when aint is spelled without an apostraphe. Here's the example: A I N ' T. See the graphic? I knew you would. Now, Shotz, practice makes oerfect. Also, regarding your exhausting narrative, a hint: Brevity is the soul of wit.

Anonymous said...

Shotzy Shoffer, I notice you have all this prattle regarding Big Kook and Wonder Boy. I waked up this morning, drove to San Onofre, got in line withall the 'locals' who've been in line since 2:00 AM, because they didn't want no kook to take their revered parking spot. Anyways, they cancelled Seymour's contest. Period! No sponser
interest. Criminy sakes, what's the future of surfing. It's going to get serious July 1st, 2008 when Governor raises Annual Pass 50%. That'll get rid of the road merchants, fer sure.



#18

Anonymous said...

Hey BK, it's only a Rubiks cube.

daisy prune said...

Surely, Allan C. moore is outta here.

the clown house said...

he is warming up his new camera to shoot footage of under age SanO girls to send back to his cellmate and to post on his myspace page. Your daughters should report him immediately to the rangers.

Mad Drunks Against Mothers said...

this blog is attempting to undermine BK's life style and we are here to protect his rights. A protest march is planned for this weekend at Big Helen's.

Moon Phase